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Frequently Asked Questions

What effect is the radiation likely to have on my disease?
With Stereotactic Radiosurgery, high-energy radiation beams aim to destroy tumor cells by damaging the cells and causing them to die. Visible results, as seen on a follow-up scan, might include shrinkage of the tumor or the cessation of further tumor growth. Because cell destruction and the absorption of the cells within your system is a lengthy process, it can take up to six months before the effect of the treatment is visible on a follow-up image.

Will there be any side effects?
The procedure itself is not painful. Your side effects may vary dependent upon the location of the tumor. For example, you might experience headaches and dizziness immediately following treatment of a brain tumor. Your doctor will discuss with you specific side effects that may occur based on your overall treatment plan.

What should I expect at my treatment session?
You don’t need to bring special clothing or equipment to the hospital for Stereotactic Radiosurgery treatment. You might want to dress comfortably and bring a book or something else to keep you busy during the waiting periods. You may also bring a friend or a relative with you and he/she may stay with you during the day. However, during the actual treatment procedure, your companion will have to leave the treatment room. Please make sure to arrange for transportation home as you might feel tired after the treatment; driving is not recommended. A complete treatment session can take place in a single-day, although your doctor will decide if your treatment should be administered in a single dose.